Keeping forests growing for the future

Trees are growing and dying every day

Because forests are dynamic living things, they are growing….and dying every day. Keeping track of forest growth, mortality and inventory is important to forest scientists and landowners who aim to keep forests growing for the future.

Growth Ver

Growth is the result of location quality, species and competition for sunlight, moisture and soil nutrients.

Mortality Hor

Mortality may be caused by overcrowding, insects, disease and fire.

Inventory Ver

Inventory is the amount of wood in standing, live trees.

Tree Icon FOREST FACT:  Over 90% of forest mortality in Idaho is on National Forest lands where forests are dying faster than they are growing.  WOW!

Tree Icon FOREST FACT:  Trees are dying from disease, fire and insects at a much faster rate than they are being logged in Idaho.

This chart expresses forest inventory, growth and mortality percentages in National Forest-, other federal-, state- and private-owned lands. Note the high rate of net annual growth on private lands and the high rate of annual mortality on National Forest lands.

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This chart shows annual growth vs. annual mortality on Idaho Forests.

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This chart shows the number of living and dead trees on Idaho’s Forests.

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This chart shows the net annual growth vs. annual harvest in 2015 on Idaho’s non-reserved forests including National Forest, other federal, state and private lands.

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This chart shows the net annual growth vs. annual harvest in 2015 on Idaho’s reserved and non-reserved forests including National Forest, other federal, state and private lands.

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This chart shows the average annual mortality vs. the 2015 harvest on reserved and non-reserved forest lands across all ownership.

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This chart shows the net annual growth, mortality and gross annual growth by management classification and ownership in Idaho forests.

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Links:

Click here to read 2017 Idaho Forest Health Highlights from the US Forest Service and the Idaho Department of Lands.